BOYFRNDZ | Natures


BLWBCK040 | Release Date : July 16th, 2013
tape C35 {66c.} + digital

Following 2012’s “All Day Pass“, Boyfrndz have continued to move forward by redesigning their unique approach to adventurous & complex rock. Produced by the former Mars Volta’s organist, Ikey Owens, the five melodic, chaotic and beautiful jewels of “Natures” change up their game; the Austin TX trio have succeeded in creating a protean multiplicity of genres somewhere between progressive, noise, punk-rock & pop. Led by the possessed and powerful voice of Scott Martin, Boyfrndz cast off the math-rock label, forging a strong identity of sonic tension and release.

1. All Get Out (7:00)
2. Moving Parts (3:33)
3. Daughter (4:59)
4. Take The Arm (4:15)
5. Water Weight (5:31)

Scott Martin: Guitar/Vocals
Aaron Perez: Drums
Joseph Raines: Bass

Written by & Performed by: Boyfrndz
Produced by: Boyfrndz & Ikey Owens
Engineered & Mixed by: Erik Wofford at Cacophony Recorders Austin
Mastered by: Dan Millice at Engine Room Audio NYC
Guest Musicians:
Ikey Owens: Keyboard/Synthesizer/String Machine (All Get Out, Moving Parts, Daughter)
Jesse Moore: Guitar (Take the Arm, Water Weight)
Mary Beth: Cello (Take the Arm)
http://www.boyfrndz.com

PRESS QUOTES

Le trio d’Austin Boyfrndz, inoculant par le biais de Scott Martin des vocalises qu’Animal Collective ne renierait pas dans un math-rock vacillant, vient de sortir le 16 juin dernier, via le label Blwbck (lire), l’EP Nature. Produit par l’ex-Mars Volta Ikey Owens, ledit maxi s’inscrit telle la première pierre dans un « cycle estival » du label dérogeant quelque peu à son esthétique expérimentale, et révèle une complexité dans le dimensionnement des mélodies plongeant l’auditeur à la fois dans le chaos et l’évidence. Moving Parts, transposé à l’image par Sean Stout de Terror Eyes TV, se révèle un maelström d’hybridations noise, punk et rock progressif tout aussi addictif que n’est dérangeante son adaptation vidéo. Daughter, dans sa longue maturation aux accents heavy, enfonce le clou. – Hartzine (Sound of The Week)

Austin’s math-pop quartet Boyfrndz utilize bedroom-rock tones and apply them to a more math sound. Having a 90′s shoegaze type of wideness, there is a darkened tension arising from this release. Being co-produced and featuring keyboardist Ikey Owens, makes this an assured exotic and erotic listening experience. Hosting one eternity into another, the grandeur of this rolling progression becomes an example. As seconds go by, the track expands its loop-oriented layering of softed and abrasive textures, this crescendo of surface tension is dramatically synthesized. Having a push and pull reactionary inner command, a compressive and polarized persona takes away from the wall of stone-structured chaos. Making the air-heavy, All Get Out , executes fresh technical chops inside a vast wasteland of effect guitars and soundscaping, mused until the end of time. Falling into an inwards kind of looping sensation, the instruments coalesce into soothing waves that show us that the second coming of Christ will be more in vain and tyrannical, than surrender. This track has bite and grabs you by the balls from the get go, making a great album opener. The contrast of Moving Parts leads the album into a much more experimental phase, and collects some very bizarre tangents and influences from all around the world. The spirit of the song being projected by desolate chants to the moonlight, this track exploits world music phrasing and note selection with a more free and avant-garde approach. The strange combination makes for a very interesting and dynamic backdrop for the drummer’s beast presence delivering Zach hill inspired chops and an art-rock deconstruction of pop takes us to something novel and peculiarly alien, the human soul. An ecology of musical guided narratives introduce Daughter. Keeping the tribal and ritualistic nature, this song effortlessly streams with the native-sounding genuine direction of Natures. There is an authentic and almost anthem-like resonance within the track. A MGMT pop validity is very present, only they are keeping true to their roots and being appropriate advocates. Being in between a mathy, video game, no-wave, assimilation and dance-directed electronic concepts, they create an engaging musical experience. The abundance of chops and complex geometries help attain a mastery over the endless possibilities with professional and mature displacement. I love having a simple base to build something out of this world, using illusions and rhythm as the focal point. I feel like that is taken into consideration with Boyfrndz. A million miles away from home,Take the Arm depicts a distant shoreline with little action, and a metal-inspired riff is harmonized over great reverb vocal tracks. Having a twinkle tendency, the group embeds so many connecting points within seemingly offset instrumentation. Having the continuous vocal harmony with the guitar and the string section ambiance, this track stands out as a true dive into the unknown. This adventurous let go into a realm not yet predetermined fades into true creation, and encompasses mind into the equation. The universe building fabric potential of this listen was crafted for all the dreamers and people who direct music in their center. Water Weight paints rain falling from leaves. Once stopped, it has a short breath and regains a high-speed falling altitude. Having a deep submerging build up, the track then comes full circle, relating the pop attentive desire, with a free-spirited fusion approach. The 6:8 waltz cartwheels the album into a gyration and rejuvenation state of stasis. The musicians take turns to invade the setting with a Rolodex of tricks, and the track is impressive yet remains at the back of the bus. This band is sure to make a mark in the growing trend of art-rock fueled mathy pop music for the desolate and deranged. Displaying heaven as a nightmarish and traditional utopia, the entire picture is within Boyfrndz. The cause and effect of sourcing such timeless concept music for a better tomorrow, today. For those who dislike labeling, I put forth the new sub-genre of concept-pop to define that Tera Melos, Zorch, and Zach Hill project sound, as I have suggested for ASIWYFA. – Don’t Spread Bullshit, Spread Music (5/5)

Boyfrndz is an Austin based trio that has eluded my ear for far too long. Their latest EP Natures is my first taste of the band and I think I jumped in at the right time. Moving beyond their math-rock past, Boyfrndz connected with former Mars Volta keyboardist Ikey Owens to co-produce their new bundle of songs that are a “dark and powerful culmination of the band’s…soaring sound that traverses everything from Drive Like Jehu’s wiry guitars, Sigur Ros’ ethereal beauty [and] early Jane’s Addiction’s outer-space hard rock.” The EP features an expansive sound meticulously constructed with layers of guitars, keys, organ, reverberated vocals, and powerful drumming that surges at you from all directions. Boyfrndz are great at building tension and match their buildups with equally confounding dramatic releases. Usually bands with enough talent to pull off progressive sounds and arrangements trip over their own gifts and leave the listener lost; however, Natures showcases one of the few that found a way to condense and control their experimental ethos to where it’s accessible and palpable to pop-leaning crowds. -Ground Floor Go

Austin based band, Boyfrndz, has been playing since 2011 with a lineup of some seriously talented musicians. Determined to make some great music, the band released their first full length album, “All Day Pass,” just a year later. Come 2013, we have their new five track EP, Natures. First track first; “All Get Out,” is one of the greatest seven minutes of music to listen to. The song is mood setting, and acts like an appetizer of what’s to come. It starts off quiet, layers of noise are built, the instruments seemingly sort themselves. The drums attack, the beginnings of a melody start to form, then the vocals, the mood intensifies, and each little piece begins to come together. It’s a great way to start the album, but things really pick up later in on the song. “All Get Out,” is like an overture of whats to come. Haunting vocals, a mix of organ sounds, hammering drums, and a vicious guitar blast through your speakers with incredible energy. From the start, Boyfrndz let’s you know what they’re made of. An EP is tricky business, a small selection of songs has to deliver big time –there’s no room for error. Natures continues to impress though, and each track speaks for itself. For instance, the fourth track, “Take The Arm,” starts off with a slow crescendo. Haunting and eerie, the song slowly builds more and more. Finally, it all comes to a head, and in a flurry of drum hits, guitar strums, and droning vocals, the song edges along more and more. Spacey, aggressive, noisy, and ethereal, Natures is a showcase of Boyfrndz’ various sounds and styles. From the catchy melodies of “Moving Parts,” to the slowed, graceful rhythms of”Water Weight,” each song stands as a testament to the band’s skill. Unfortunately, as is the way of EPs, it’s difficult to give some solid words overall. Per each of it’s five tracks, Natures is awesome. There’s little to dislike about it, but at the same time, little to actually love about it. Boyfrndz has produced a song or two that will sell the EP itself alone, that’s undeniable; but Natures is an EP and as such, it only has a couple of those “a-ha!” moments. In fact, at times, the entire thing can come off a little overcooked. Boyfrndz doesn’t have a terribly individualistic style, and therefore without much variation in their sound, this isn’t a very replayable EP. Without being a prior fan of Boyfrndz, or even remotely knowing the band well, I’m sold. There’s not a single doubt that Natures is good. Each song is a beautiful math rock endeavor. Hopefully, in the future, we’ll have more Boyfrndz, and more excellent music. – Surviving The Golden Age (7/10)

Siamo tutti morti dopo l’estate. Il rientro dalle ferie (o presunti tali) ci abbatte proprio come i corpi stagliati sulla copertina di questo Natures, pubblicato dai Boyfrndz per la BLWBCK. Anagrammi ricorrenti, acronimi diffusi, composizioni musicali cangianti e fuori dagli schemi. Il trio originario di Austine, TX, ci propone 5 pezzi che suonano molto sperimentali, ma soprattutto moltissimo alternative. Ci conviene forse partire dalla fine, vale a dire dalla fantastica Water Weight, dove il peso dell’acqua può risultare leggero come la ferma voce di Scott Martin (un vero portento, ve ne accorgerete presto), o pesantissimo come i rintocchi della batteria di Aaron Perez. Uno spettacolo. Il gioco di rimandi e rincorse tra la voce e la chitarra è un punto di forza dei Boyfrndz, come dimostra anche la traccia di apertura: All Get Out sorprende, dando un tocco mistico e misterioso all’album. A me sembra di risentire a tratti i Pusherman di Floored, ma con una costruzione più barocca, progressive: Moving Parts prosegue su questo sentiero scosceso, mantenendo un costante equilibrio nonostante il terreno accidentato . D’altronde a produrre è stato chiamato Ikey Owens, ex Mars Volta, e i rimandi ci stanno tutti. Cambi di tempo e di atmosfere, sbalzi temporali ma sonorità che ricordano gli anni ’90 e gente come gli Stone Temple Pilots. Daughter si spinge forse un po’ troppo lontano, ma per innovare bisogna osare e i Boyfrndz lo hanno fatto, creando un bel disco che si discosta da gran parte delle produzioni attuali. Se volete qualcosa di fresco e diverso dal solito, provate a darci un ascolto. – Umberto Profazio for MusicZoom

Boyfrndz welds an unruly amount of power. ‘Natures’ is a primal record. Brash, energetic and loud it is what rock ought to be. Every track is burned through quite quickly. The entirety of ‘Natures’ manages to keep this up. After a while the sheer intensity overwhelms the listener. Respites from this energy are far and few between. Honestly the drums lead much of this movement having a particularly prominent place in the mix. ‘All Get Out’ starts things out in epic fashion. With the guitars introducing everything in elegance it moves on from there, letting the drums drive the piece. Things move fast on the track. Each avenue is explored. At the end things are let loose with the song coming together in a glorious mess at the end. By far this is the best track on all of ‘Natures’. ‘Moving Parts’ has more of an anthem quality to it and is almost a break from the frantic energy of ‘All Get Out’. ‘Daughter’ comes out swinging for the stars. Here there is a rather comfortable groove for the song that lasts for the duration with little interruption. Around the three minute mark is where things get particularly excitable. ‘Take The Arm’ is a bit sadder in nature as opposed to most of the album. Almost reflective it is Boyfrndz at their most introspective. ‘Water Weight’ ends things off on a mellow note as the exhausted band lurches towards an ending. For these tracks build up considerably over time gaining power from their duration, accumulating it as they roll on moving ever forward. – Beach Sloth (6.9/10)

Sometimes I come upon an album that I really want to like, but just can’t get into. Natures, the new EP by art-rock trio Boyfrndz is a prime example of such a release; it’s intricate yet still retains a sense of fun, and as unconventional as much of the song structure is, there are hooks waiting around every corner. Yet, there’s something getting in the way of my enjoyment of Natures. One suspect could be the way the EP is mixed. Usually, sound quality doesn’t prove to be much of a problem for me, but I really think that Natures could benefit from tighter production. Epic soundscapes like those crafted by Boyfrndz should soar, and the crescendos and choruses on this release sound slightly restrained by the muddy mixing. Like many bands from their hometown of Austin, Texas, Boyfrndz take a layered, guitar-based approach to their music, focusing on fast-paced, quirky instrumentation. I hate to use the term “math rock,” but I think it may be warranted here. Think of a livelier Explosions In The Sky with pop-centric vocal arrangements. The singing may even get in the way of the tight riffs, which are really the driving force behind Natures. I think I may even like it better if the five songs were instrumentals. Boyfrndz take a risk on Natures by leading off with the EP’s longest track, “All Get Out”, which clocks in at exactly seven minutes. Although not a bad song, it’s not sharp and hooky enough to really grab one’s attention. “Moving Parts” would have made a better first impression. The song launches directly into the track’s hard-hitting chorus, and then, just as quickly, reconstructs itself into a Radiohead-like breakdown. The only track that really stuck with me though was the fifth and final cut, “Water Weight”. Although it’s the EP’s slowest track, the combination of burning chords and razor sharp percussion make for a wonderfully scathing song. Although a fun listen, Natures will mostly leave listeners disappointed. – EarBuddy (6.3/10)

Caught this band in my hometown last night, on tour from Austin, Texas. These gentlemen put on a very strong live performance, all the while graciously thanking the crowd for their attention and support. Take a journey with this experimental noise-pop outfit on their newest release Natures or check out any of their older releases, all available for name-your-price download. – Moosick

Siamo tutti morti dopo l’estate. Il rientro dalle ferie (o presunti tali) ci abbatte proprio come i corpi stagliati sulla copertina di questo Natures, pubblicato dai Boyfrndz per la BLWBCK. Anagrammi ricorrenti, acronimi diffusi, composizioni musicali cangianti e fuori dagli schemi. Il trio originario di Austine, TX, ci propone 5 pezzi che suonano molto sperimentali, ma soprattutto moltissimo alternative. Ci conviene forse partire dalla fine, vale a dire dalla fantastica Water Weight, dove il peso dell’acqua può risultare leggero come la ferma voce di Scott Martin (un vero portento, ve ne accorgerete presto), o pesantissimo come i rintocchi della batteria di Aaron Perez. Uno spettacolo. Il gioco di rimandi e rincorse tra la voce e la chitarra è un punto di forza dei Boyfrndz, come dimostra anche la traccia di apertura: All Get Out sorprende, dando un tocco mistico e misterioso all’album. A me sembra di risentire a tratti i Pusherman di Floored, ma con una costruzione più barocca, progressive: Moving Parts prosegue su questo sentiero scosceso, mantenendo un costante equilibrio nonostante il terreno accidentato . D’altronde a produrre è stato chiamato Ikey Owens, ex Mars Volta, e i rimandi ci stanno tutti. Cambi di tempo e di atmosfere, sbalzi temporali ma sonorità che ricordano gli anni ’90 e gente come gli Stone Temple Pilots. Daughter si spinge forse un po’ troppo lontano, ma per innovare bisogna osare e i Boyfrndz lo hanno fatto, creando un bel disco che si discosta da gran parte delle produzioni attuali. Se volete qualcosa di fresco e diverso dal solito, provate a darci un ascolto. – MusicZoom